Kids want their own cellphones, too, and it’s amazing how young they are when we give in to their demands

Some cool cellphone images:

Kids want their own cellphones, too, and it’s amazing how young they are when we give in to their demands
cellphone

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This little girl, and her babysitter, were crossing 86th Street at Broadway.

Note: this photo was published in an undated (Feb 2010) blog with the same caption as the title that I used for this Flickr page. And it was published in a Jun 20, 2010 blog titled ""

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Looking back on some old photos from 40-50 years ago, I was struck by how visible the differences were between the culture of then, versus the culture of now. In some cases, it was evident from the things people wore, or carried, or did, back then which they no longer do today. But sometimes it was the opposite: things that didn’t exist back in the 1960s and 1970s have become a pervasive part of today’s culture.

A good example is the cellphone: 20 years ago, it simply didn’t exist. Even ten years ago, it was a relatively uncommon sight, and usually only on major streets of big cities. Today, of course, cell phones are everywhere, and everyone is using them in a variety of culture contexts.

However, I don’t think this is a permanent phenomenon; after all, if you think back to the early 1980s, you probably would have seen a lot of people carrying Sony Walkmans, or "boom-box" portable radios — all of which have disappeared…

If Moore’s Law (which basically says that computers double in power every 18 months) holds up for another decade, then we’ll have computerized gadgets approximately 100 times smaller, faster, cheaper, and better — which means far better integration of music, camera, messaging, and phone, but also the possibility of the devices being so tiny that they’re embedded into our eyeglasses, our earrings, or a tattoo on our forehead.

So the point of this album is to provide a frame of reference — so that we can (hopefully) look back 10-20 years from now, and say, "Wasn’t it really weird that we behaved in such bizarre ways while we interacted with those primitive devices?"

Personalized Cellphone
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This is the photo chosen by David Rainbird (and/with Motorola I guess). They printed it in an article about cellphones and what people do to personalize their own cellphones, with another photos from different people all over the world (Japan, Russia, USA, UK…).
Thanks David and everyone who visits here and enjoy my work and photos and stuff… :)

Me and my cellphone, #2
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Broadway malls, Jun 2008 – 250

Taken on the north side of 91st Street, from the east side of Broadway, heading south. This woman was talking intently on her cellphone, surrounded by pretty flowers to which she paid no attention … I couldn’t figure out what she was holding in her left hand …

Note: this photo was published in a Jul 24, 2008 NowPublic blog article entitled "." Exactly two years later, it was published in a Jul 24, 2010 , with the same creative title as the caption that I used on this Flickr page.

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In late June, I spent three afternoons walking up and down Broadway, on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, from 72nd Street to Columbia University at 115th Street. My objective was to photograph the variety of people sitting on park benches along what is formally known as the "Broadway malls" — ie., benches located on the north side and south side of the median strip that separates the uptown side of Broadway from the downtown side.

Since my travels did encompass three separate days, I saw an even wider variety than I might have seen on a single afternoon; on the other hand, the pictures all reflect a single season. At Toni’s suggestion, I’m going to make a similar photo-journal in the fall, winter, and spring — to see if there are entirely different people, or whether it’s basically the same people, but wearing different clothes…

In any case, on this occasion I saw young and old, black and white, men and women, rich and poor — students, children, retired people, widows, widowers, homeless people, construction workers, babysitters, and tourists. As is common in today’s society, a remarkable number of them were chatting on cellphones; but it was refreshing to see that many of them were chatting with each other. It was also a little sad to see several people sitting alone, with a wistful, melancholy look on their face.

Most of the park benches were occupied, though a few were empty. Most of the empty benches were fairly uninteresting, but a few looked sufficiently inviting that I felt they deserved a photo of their own.

For the most part, I ignored the photo opportunities that I saw on the sidewalk as I strolled along. But there were two major exceptions, as you’ll see midway through this collection: a young man with a bubble-making gadget, blowing the largest soap-bubbles I have ever seen; and a chess game between two middle-aged men. I also photographed a few of the street signs along the way — actually, I photographed *every* street sign, so that I could identify (and geotag) the location of all the other photographs.

I must have looked fairly serious as I went about my picture-taking activities, for three different people asked me if I was a photographer; and two different people asked me if I liked the Nikon D300 that I was using. As for the subjects of the pictures: most didn’t even realize I was photographing them, for I took advantage of a long telephoto lens to shoot them from afar. But a few did notice, and I got a couple of smiles and scowls. If any of them do happen to stumble upon the Flickr site where these pictures will live, I hope they’ll feel I’ve treated them kindly… I love them all …

Since this post came out, google it seems rushed to clarify things, seeing as this positive affirmation of a waterproof smartphone may not actually be the case, and that it is a definite if

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